Robocop: A discussion of Taylorism through the works of Marx and Haraway

In the next week or two I’ll be working on some entries about the Robocop films.  I decided to analyze the movies through the theoretical contexts of Karl Marx’s Alienation of Labor and Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto.  Good “light” reading if I do say so myself.    

You could accuse of me of attempting to justify my poor practice of watching on-demand movies or DVRed sports games while studying or writing, but I think I might be on to something here. Watching the first two Robocop movies (The third installment in the series could be likened to how the original Casino Royale, prior to the Daniel Craig movie, of the James Bond series was an embarrassing farce never meant to see the light of day.) I realize that the films actually present, in allegorical form, a number of philosophical and ethical questions regarding the effects of capitalism’s industrialization upon human beings. This is especially true in terms of the ways in which Frederick Taylor’s systems of scientific management exacerbated the mechanization of humanity. (Thanks to college all science fiction movies to me are now cultural manifestations of social theory.)  

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3 Responses to “Robocop: A discussion of Taylorism through the works of Marx and Haraway”

  1. […] Robocop: A discussion of Taylorism through the works of Marx and Haraway « The 50 Megaton Paper Tig… "In the next week or two I’ll be working on some entries about the Robocop films. I decided to analyze the movies through the theoretical contexts of Karl Marx’s Alienation of Labor and Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto. Good “light” reading if I do say so myself." (tags: blog northamerica media marxism postmodernism) […]

  2. […] Haraway’s cyborgisms and Marx’s alienation of labor and its use for interpreting the mega-blockbuser dark comedy Robocop (it was pretty hilarious, in a dark movie sense, the way officer Murphy got trashed by all that […]

  3. […] Haraway’s cyborgisms and Marx’s alienation of labor and its use for interpreting the mega-blockbuser dark comedy Robocop (it was pretty hilarious, in a dark movie sense, the way officer Murphy got trashed by all that […]

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